THANK YOU!

Big thank you to everyone who came to honor Norma Miller and celebrate Lindy Hop with us this weekend! Please carry Norma Miller’s legacy with you along with that of Frankie Manning, Al Minns, and the history and roots of the Lindy Hop.

Panel: The Pivotal Role of Al Minns on Modern Day Lindy Hop

In partnership with Lincoln Center

Friday Teacher Introduction

Saturday Performance

Sunday Tribute to Frankie Manning

Videos of the panels coming soon…


**Norma Miller honored throughout the weekend**

For information about Norma Miller’s viewing, burial, and celebration of life on Friday, May 24th, click here



History

This May will mark the 35 year anniversary of three Swedes, Anders Lind, Henning Sörensen, and Lennart, visiting New York for the first time looking for the roots of the Lindy Hop. It was then that they met Al Minns and first saw Frankie Manning. Lennart’s close relationship with Frankie began soon after with a deep friendship and a 35 year legacy of studying Lindy Hop from both of their teachings. The date happened to also coincide with Frankie’s birthday, which has been an important date for all Lindy Hoppers everywhere since the resurgence.

Spirit

The spirit of the event is to return to the approach that dancers took 35 years ago when they were first discovering Lindy Hop. Imagine what it was like to learn about Lindy Hop before YouTube, Google, and social media, when you had to investigate exactly how Al Minns, Frankie Manning, and other original Harlem dancers moved and interpreted jazz music. Imagine what it was like when all of your learning was directly from the surviving dancers from the Savoy Ballroom or from studying old videos.

Roots

The idea is to get back to both the roots of the dance but also the roots of learning, focusing on the Harlem and African American history and on the lessons that those Harlem dancers first shared with their curious students. These workshops will get back to the roots of the dance, reviving some the spirit of how Lennart, eWa, and other dancers from the 1980s first approached learning Lindy Hop, with deep respect for the history of the dance.

Respect

Join us with fresh eyes, a curious spirit, a deep respect for the Harlem history, and an unfaltering connection between jazz dancing and jazz music.

 

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